ALS Advocacy

ALS Advocacy
Lou Gehrig's Disease - Motor Neuron Disease - Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis
Thought it had been cured by now? Still no known cause. Still no cure. Still quickly fatal. Still outrageous.

Tuesday, August 22, 2017

Ask The (Please Be Specific)

Over the years I've experienced many "Ask the Experts" sessions related to ALS.  It's always a panel of neuroscientists who talk a lot about ALS research and then take a few questions.

The "Expert" crown defaults to them.  They speak from the dais.  We get to listen a lot and ask.  They are by default "The Experts" in the fight against ALS.

But wait, there are all kinds of people with superb and valuable knowledge related to ALS --

  • There are people who know a lot about insurance.
  • There are people who know a lot about communication technology.
  • There are people who know a lot about low-tech hacks.
  • There are people who know a lot about suction machines.
  • There are people who know a lot about breathing.
  • There are people who know a lot about the FDA.
  • There are people who know a lot about moving a person on and off a commode.
  • There are people who know a lot about taxes.
  • There are people who know a lot about drugs.
  • There are people who know a lot about data.
  • There are people who know a lot about choking.
  • There are people who know a lot about financing research.
  • There are people who know a lot about stem cells.
  • There are people who know a lot about feeding tubes and nutrition.
  • There are people who know a lot about what's important in living with the beast ALS.
  • There are people who know a lot about primary care in ALS.
  • There are people who know a lot about constipation.

Our default implication for the word experts being neuroscientists is revealing. There are many people in the fight against ALS, including those living with it, who know a lot.  We still live in a hierarchy where people with ALS and caregivers are at the bottom.

Words matter.  "Expert" is not a royal title to be owned by anyone by default.

It's time for simple changes to some traditions.  "Ask the Neuroscientists," anyone?


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